2017 – Older Talks

 Date: April 25, 2017 Speaker: Mihaela P. Harper Academic Affiliation: CCI, Bilkent University Title: Georgi Gospodinov’s There, Where We Are Not: Beyond, Between, Elsewhere, and Nowhere Description: After his last novel, The Physics of Sorrow, prompted Jean-Luc Nancy to urge everyone to read it “sans délai,” a much-anticipated volume of poetry by Bulgarian writer Georgi Gospodinov appeared in print in April 2016. He writes “In Place of a Preface” that this is a book “Not about the cities,...
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2006 – 2001 – Older Talks

A talk presented by Prof. Olivier Abel, of The Protestant Institute of Theology, Paris. Abstract: There are certain things that cannot be forced. We cannot make someone believe any more than we can make them remember, make them love any more than we can make them forgive and forget. The danger facing every politics of memory is to declare a duty of remembering, if not of forgetting, and to build on that an official version of history. To clarify the relationship between memory and history, wi...
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2010 – Older Talks

Unwritten History or Unwriting History: On Armenians, Greeks and Jews in Turkish Literature The contributions made by non-Muslim authors to Ottoman Turkish literature have largely been ignored by mainstream literary historians and critics. This papers aims to present Armeno-Turkish, Judeo-Turkish and Karamanli literatures and to explore the challenges it represents for Turkish literary historiography and criticism. Date: 23 November 2010 Speaker: Dr. Laurent Mignon, Bilkent University, Depart...
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2011 – Older Talks

The Allure of the Undead: Jan Potocki’s Manuscript Found in Saragossa This paper considers Jan Potocki’s Manuscript Found in Saragossa in light of its intervention into 19th century struggles between the romantic and the novelistic. Potocki’s text illuminates the links between debates about genre and discourses of civilization and savagery, highlighting the ambiguous role of reading in the formation of the ‘civilized’ modern subject. Considered by Tzvetan Todorov to be an emblematic example ...
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2012 – Older Talks

"The Barbaric Reader: Revolution and Secrecy in Bolaño's Distant Star" This paper analyzes Bolaño's 1996 novel Distant Star, and specifically the novel's narrator, a voracious reader who desires nothing more than to be a revolutionary. Though his political activities seem doomed to failure, I argue that the novel puts forth a concept of "permanent revolution" in the narrator's betrayals of the texts he reads so closely, even though -- indeed, because -- he himself is unaware of these betrayals....
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2013 – Older Talks

Taking McLuhan Seriously The media theorist Marshall McLuhan is often dismissed as a trendy television pundit of the 1960s, even if one who occasionally resurfaces with each new media revolution: the internet, smartphones, the cloud. My view is that McLuhan is actually one of the most important figures in the 20th century humanities, one whose basic teachings are still far from exhausted or even understood. In this lecture I will focus on the important features of McLuhan’s “tetrad” theory, a...
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2014-2015 – Older Talks

Thursday 4 December 2014 7–10pm The Challenge of Aesthetic Skepticism and the Importance of Being Profound Patrick Fessenbecker - Assistant Professor in CCI The twenty-first century has seen the development and spread of a variety of new methodologies for literary study, from Franco Moretti's "Distant Reading" to the "history of the book" approaches of Leah Price and others. Despite their diversity, these approaches share a certain refusal: they rej...
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